Radon Information

Festa Radon Technologies recommends use of the EPA’s guides to radon to provide radon information to customers. Click on the following links to find more information about radon, effects of radon, and ways to eliminate radon. The EPA web site listed below has the complete documents and additional information.

The National Cancer Institute

The National Cancer Institute provides a fact sheet on radon and lung cancer as well as links to scientific studies.

Radon decays quickly, giving off tiny radioactive particles. When inhaled, these radioactive particles can damage the cells that line the lung. Long-term exposure to radon can lead to lung cancer, the only cancer proven to be associated with inhaling radon.

The National Safety Council

The National Safety Council offers numerous helpful fact sheets on radon and radiation.

People who breathe in radioactive particles, swallow water with high radon levels or are exposed to radon for a long period of time are susceptible to lung damage and lung cancer. The Environmental Protection Agency says nearly 1 out of every 15 homes in America is estimated to have elevated radon levels.

The American Lung Association

The American Lung Association’s website provides information, fact sheets, and links relevant to radon and radon-induced lung cancer. Enter the site, then type “radon” in the Search option

If you find that your home has dangerous levels of radon, there is a solution. High levels of radon indoors can be lowered through a variety of repairs. From sealing cracks in floors and walls to changing the flow of air into the building, you can protect your family. Repairs to decrease radon levels should be made by a U.S. EPA- or state-certified contractor.

U.S. EPA

Radon information and publications from the U.S. EPA

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that can cause lung cancer.
You can’t see or smell radon. Testing is the only way to know your level of exposure.  Radon can have a big impact on indoor air quality.

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From the EPA’s “A Citizen’s Guide to Radon:”

 

Radon is a cancer-causing, radioactive gas.

 

You can't see radon. And you can't smell it or taste it. But it may be a problem in your home.

 

Radon is estimated to cause many thousands of deaths each year. That's because when you breathe air containing radon, you can get lung cancer. In fact, the Surgeon General has warned that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States today. Only smoking causes more lung cancer deaths. If you smoke and your home has high radon levels, your risk of lung cancer is especially high.

 

Radon can be found all over the U.S.

 

Radon comes from the natural (radioactive) breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water and gets into the air you breathe. Radon can be found all over the U.S. It can get into any type of building - homes, offices, and schools - and build up to high levels. But you and your family are most likely to get your greatest exposure at home. That's where you spend most of your time.

 

You should test for radon.

 

Testing is the only way to know if you and your family are at risk from radon. EPA and the Surgeon General recommend testing all homes below the third floor for radon. EPA also recommends testing in schools.

 

Testing is inexpensive and easy - it should only take a few minutes of your time. Millions of Americans have already tested their homes for radon.

 

You can fix a radon problem.

 

There are simple ways to fix a radon problem that aren't too costly. Even very high levels can be reduced to acceptable levels.

 

From the EPA’s “Consumer’s Guide to Radon Reduction:”

 

Reduce Radon Levels In Your Home

 

Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer. The Surgeon General and the EPA recommend testing for radon and reducing radon in homes that have high levels. Fix your home if your radon level is confirmed to be 4 picoCuries per liter (pCi/L) or higher. Radon levels less than 4 pCi/L still pose a risk, and in many cases may be reduced. If you smoke and your home has high radon levels, your risk of lung cancer is especially high.

 

Select A State Certified And/Or RPP Contractor

 

Choose a radon contractor to fix your home who is state certified and/or listed for radon reduction [mitigation] in EPA's National Radon Proficiency Program (RPP). RPP-listed mitigation contractors are trained, must pass a comprehensive exam, and must agree to follow standards developed to ensure effective radon reduction. Call your state radon office for a list of qualified contractors in your area.

 

Radon Reduction Techniques Work

 

Radon reduction systems work. Some radon reduction systems can reduce radon levels in your home by up to 99%. The cost of fixing a home generally ranges from $500 to $2500. Your costs may vary depending on the size and design of your home and which radon reduction methods are needed. Thousands of people have reduced radon levels in their homes.

 

Maintain Your Radon Reduction System

 

Maintaining your radon reduction system takes little effort and keeps the system working properly and radon levels low.

 

From the EPA’s “Home Buyer’s and Seller’s Guide to Radon”:

 

Radon Is a Cancer-Causing, Radioactive Gas

 

You cannot see, smell, or taste radon. But it still may be a problem in your home. When you breathe air containing radon, you increase your risk of getting lung cancer. In fact, the Surgeon General of the United States has warned that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States today. If you smoke and your home has high radon levels, your risk of lung cancer is especially high.

 

National Academy of Sciences Report on Radon

 

In February 1998, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) released its report on radon and lung cancer, The Health Effects of Exposure to Indoor Radon (the BEIR VI report). The NAS is an independent, non-governmental, scientific organization. The NAS estimates that radon causes between 15,000 and 22,000 lung cancer deaths each year in the United States and that 12 percent of all lung cancer deaths are linked to radon. The BEIR VI Committee (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) concluded that after smoking, radon is the second leading cause of death due to lung cancer in the United States.

You Should Test for Radon

 

Testing is the only way to find out your home's radon levels. EPA and the Surgeon General recommend testing all homes below the third floor for radon.

 

You Can Fix a Radon Problem

 

If you find that you have high radon levels, there are ways to fix a radon problem. Even very high levels can be reduced to acceptable levels.

 

If You Are Selling a Home ...

 

EPA recommends that you test your home before putting it on the market and, if necessary, lower your radon levels. Save the test results and all information you have about steps that were taken to fix any problems. This could be a positive selling point.

 

If You Are Buying a Home...

 

EPA recommends that you know what the indoor radon level is in any home you consider buying. Ask the seller for their radon test results. If the home has a radon-reduction system, ask the seller for information they have about the system.

 

If the home has not yet been tested, you should have the housed tested.

 

If you are having a new home built, there are features that can be incorporated into your home during construction to reduce radon levels.

 

The radon testing guidelines in this Guide have been developed specifically to deal with the time-sensitive nature of home purchases and sales, and the potential for radon device interference. These guidelines are slightly different from the guidelines in other EPA publications which provide radon testing and reduction information for non-real estate situations.

 

This Guide recommends three short-term testing options for real estate transactions. EPA also recommends testing a home in the lowest level which is currently suitable for occupancy, since a buyer may choose to live in a lower area of the home than that used by the seller.

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